Advanced Study on Soil Quality Response to Long-Term Nutrients and Management Practice to Potato Production in Ultisols of Subtropical China

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Advanced Study on Soil Quality Response to Long-Term Nutrients and Management Practice to Potato Production in Ultisols of Subtropical China

March 3, 2021 Environment and Earth Science 0

The creation of a sustainable agricultural system necessitates an understanding of soil quality, the degree and effect of degradation processes, and the existing land use management strategy. Soil response to management and inputs are important factors that are based on soil quality, and this study looked at Ultisols in subtropical China. Long-term studies in Asia have shown that over-exploitation of soils has resulted in the exhaustion of intensive agricultural production systems, with gradually decreasing productivity. From 2000 to 2009, improvements in soil quality were calculated using acceptable indicators in a long-term experiment at the Taoyuan Station in Hunan Province, China. The data was analysed using the SAS statistical package for ANOVA, and the means were separated using DNMRT and graphically matched to establish threshold limits for a minimum threshold data collection. The soils responded favourably with the Sweet potato-rape/NP+straw treatment (7.18 g kg-1) contributing significantly (P0.05) higher total carbon, while the Sweet potato-rape/nil fertiliser and Fallow/nil fertiliser application treatments contributed the least total carbon. Sweet potato-rape/NP+ straw contributed the most total nitrogen (0.882 g kg-1) and was slightly (P0.05) higher than the other treatments. The sweet potato-rape/NPK+stalk treatment created substantially more biomass carbon (132.66 mg kg-1) than the other treatments, suggesting that it is a stronger biomass carbon contributor. Sweet potato-rape/NPK+stalk added 23.96 mg kg-1 of biomass nitrogen to the Ultisols, which was substantially higher than Sweet potato-rape/NPK (18.34 mg kg-1), Sweet potato-rape/nil fertiliser (16.36 mg kg-1) or Fallow/nil fertiliser (14.92 mgkg-1). In contrast to Sweet potato-rape/NPK, treatments with stalk amendments resulted in increases of 3.6 to 5.7 percent biomass carbon and 15.8 to 23.5 percent biomass nitrogen. Organic matter inputs as complement fertiliser materials were blamed for increasing trends in biomass carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the Ultisols. In the Ultisols, the study found that the Sweet potato-rape/NP+straw treatment (7.18 g kg-1) contributed significantly more total carbon than the other treatments (P0.05), followed by Peanut-broadbean/NP+straw (6.81 g kg-1) that contributed significantly more total carbon than the other treatments (P0.05), and the least total carbon was contributed by Sweet potato-rape/nil fertiliser and Fallow/nil fertiliser application treatments. Potato yields have declined by as much as 65.57 percent since 2007, necessitating further study to determine the cause of the decline and avoid possible yield depressions. To improve future soil quality monitoring in support of sustainable crop production and national food security, threshold limits for a selected minimum data set for the subtropical China area Ultisols on sweet potato production were established.

Author (s) Details

A. C. Odunze
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China and Department of Soil Science/IAR, Ahmadu Bello University, P.M.B. 1044, Zaria, Nigeria.

Jinshui Wu
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China.

Shoulong Liu
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China.

Hanhua Zhu
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China.

Tida Ge
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China.

Yi Wang
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China.

Qiao Luo
Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125, China.

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