Research on the Effect of Irrigation Intervals on the Growth and Yield of Quinoa Crop and Its Components

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Research on the Effect of Irrigation Intervals on the Growth and Yield of Quinoa Crop and Its Components

March 29, 2021 Agricultural Sciences 0

The aim of this experiment was to see how irrigation intervals affected quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa willd) plant growth, yield, and components, as well as some chemical characteristics of the soil after harvest. Quinoa is a plant that is immune to a variety of stresses, including salinity, cold air, high solar radiation, low temperature, and soil pH differences. Three treatments were used in a randomised full block system with four replicates: T1 (twice weekly irrigation, which is typical in the region), T2 (once weekly irrigation), and T3 (once irrigation every two weeks). The crop coefficient (Kc) value varied depending on the stage of development, with the T2 treatment having the highest mean in all traits except the number of seed/m2, and the T3 treatment having the lowest mean in all traits except the number of seed/m2. The results also showed that raising the amount of water reduced agronomic traits like harvest index, number of seeds, seed yield, and straw/m2. It was also discovered that irrigation had no effect on the pH of soils, but had a substantial impact on Ec. Under all studied treatments, the correlation coefficient was negative for the majority of traits and low for the number of grains (0.34), indicating that quinoa is a plant that needs only a small amount of irrigation water. The harvest index, on the other hand, had a good positive association with grain yield (0.92). The findings showed that moisture stress treatments increased ionic, NH4-N, and NO3-N concentrations significantly when compared to soils without moisture stress (T1, T2). We believe that quinoa plant production based on Kc during growth stages aids in irrigation management and precise water application. These findings suggest that the quinoa plant’s water requirements are modest, and that the crop’s growth and quality are unaffected by a lack of irrigation water.

Author (s) Details

Abdullah M. Algosaibi
Agricultural Environment & Natural Resources Department, College of Agriculture & Food Sciences, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia.

Ayman E. Badran
Genetic Resources Department, Desert Research Center, Cairo, Egypt.

Abdulrahman M. Almadini
Agricultural Environment & Natural Resources Department, College of Agriculture & Food Sciences, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia.

Mohammed M. El-Garawany
Agricultural & Veterinary Research & Training Station, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia.

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