Serological Thymidine Kinase1 is a Biomarker for Early Risk of Tumours Progression —Real World Data from a Health Screening Study on a Cohort of 35,365 People

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Serological Thymidine Kinase1 is a Biomarker for Early Risk of Tumours Progression —Real World Data from a Health Screening Study on a Cohort of 35,365 People

June 9, 2021 Physical Science 0

STK1p, a serological thymidine kinase 1 (STK1p) proliferation marker, is a reliable prognostic, monitoring, and relapse marker. The application of STK1p in health screening for early diagnosis of pre-malignant and malignant disorders was examined in this study. The research was based on 35,365 people who took part in four separate health screening studies in China from 2005 to 2019 using Real World Data. All of the individuals were given a clinical examination. A sensitive chemiluminescent dot blot ECL assay was used to measure the quantity of STK1p. The STK1p test had a ROC value of 0.96. The likelihood (+) value was 236.5 at a cut-off STK1p value of 2.0 pM, and the sensitivity and specificity were 0.78 and 0.99, respectively. The proportion of city dwellers with elevated STK1p values (>2.0 pM) was 0.8 percent (198/26,484), while the proportion of oil-field employees with elevated STK1p values (>2.0 pM) was 5.8 percent (514/8,355). In comparison to city inhabitants, the latter group had significantly greater rates of refractory anaemia, fatty liver, and obesity, but no incidences of breast or prostate hyperplasia were found. People who worked in oil drilling/transportation also had higher STK1p levels and a greater rate of pre-malignancies and benign illnesses than those who worked in oil-field administration. When comparing people with low STK1p values (2.0 pM) to people with high STK1p values (>2.0 pM), a statistically significantly higher number of people were found to have malignancies, pre-malignancies of all types, moderate/severe type of hyperplasia of breast or prostate, or refractory anaemia, or to be at high risk for hepatitis B. In the STK1p low group, no malignancies were discovered. Compared to 52.4 percent of individuals with low STK1p values, 85.4 percent of those with elevated STK1p values had illnesses linked to a higher risk of pre-/early neoplastic development. Persons with low STK1p levels (n=6,352/26,484) and raised STK1p values (170/702) were randomly selected and followed for 132 months. People with increased STK1p values had a 4 times higher chance of developing malignancies than people with low STK1p values. Based on official cancer statistics in China, the risk value was derived using an expected cancer occurrence incidence of 0.2 percent among people with low STK1p. We conclude that serological TK1 protein concentration is a reliable diagnostic for predicting the likelihood of cancer progression in the early stages.

Author (s) Details

Zhi-Heng Chen
Health Management Centre, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, China.

Xia Cao
Health Management Centre, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, China.

Shou-Qing Huang
Healthy Centre of the Affiliated Second Hospital, Fujian Chinese Tradition Medicine University, China.

Guo-zhan Zhao
Jilin Oil Field General Hospital, Jilin 131106, China.

Ai Zeng Yang
Department of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine, Nanjing 81 Hospital, Jiangsu 210002, China.

Jian Wen
Department of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine, Nanjing Tumor Hospital, Nanjing 210011, China.

Xiao-Hong Xu
Department of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou 310022, China.

Yan Chen
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Research, Fujian Cancer Hospital of Fujian Medical University Teaching Hospital, Fuzhou 350014, China.

Qu-Bo Chen
Chinese Medicine Hospital, Guangdong 510120, China.

Ying-Hong Wang
Central Laboratory, Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS), Beijing 100021, China.

Ellen He
Shenzhen SSTK Precision Medicine Institute, Shenzhen 518057, China.

Ji Zhou
Shenzhen SSTK Precision Medicine Institute, Shenzhen 518057, China.

Sven Skog
Shenzhen SSTK Precision Medicine Institute, Shenzhen 518057, China.

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