Advanced Study on Uptake of Zn, Pb, Cu and Fe Ions from Spent and Unspent Engine Oil Using Termite Soil

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Advanced Study on Uptake of Zn, Pb, Cu and Fe Ions from Spent and Unspent Engine Oil Using Termite Soil

February 9, 2021 Chemical Science 0

Using Termite dust, the removal of Zn, Pb, Cu and Fe ions from unspent and spent engine oil was examined. The improper handling of spent engine oil contributes to the accumulation of essential inorganic nutrients such as phosphorus, calcium and magnesium, as well as trace quantities of lead, zinc, iron, copper and cobalt. When in abundance, these elements accumulate in plant tissues. The process parameters were varied, such as contact time and adsorbent dose. Values from contact time were used to estimate their uptake kinetics equation. Percentage adsorption for both spent and unspent engine oil was of the order Fe>Zn>Cu>Pb at the optimum time of 40 minutes. Kinetic equations have been tested, such as Elovich, Intra-particle, Pseudo-first order, and Pseudo-second order. The results obtained suggest that their sequestering pattern fits into the kinetics of the pseudo-second order. Initial reaction speeds, h (mg/g.min) and alpha (mg. g-1min-1) for all metal ions obtained from Pseudo-second order and Elovich kinetic models followed patterns in spent engine oil Zn>Fe>Cu>Pb and Zn>Fe>Pb>Cu respectively, while Fe>Zn>Cu>Pb for h (mg/g.min) and Zn>Fe>Pb>Cu for alpha engine oil were trended for unspent engine oil (mg. g-1min-1). The high initial reaction of Zn and Fe ions was supported by electrostatic attraction on the surface of the adsorbent, suggesting a good ion affinity for the adsorbent. The desorption constant β (g/mg) was Cu>Pb>Fe>Zn and Cu>Pb>Zn>Fe respectively for spent and unspent engine oils. Constant kid (mgg-1 min-1/2) intra-particle diffusion followed a similar trend, showing heavy binding than any of the metal ions between Zn and termite soil. Several kinetics models were tested, but the best way to predict the kinetics for the absorption of the metal ions studied was pseudo-second-order kinetics. A kinetic mechanism for the absorption of the studied ions from spent and unspent engine oil could be suggested by this pilot study.

Author (s) Details

Iwekumo Agbozu
Department of Environmental Management and Toxicology, Federal University of Petroleum Resources, P.M.B 1221, Effurun, Delta State, Nigeria.

Bassey Uwem
Department of Environmental Management and Toxicology, Federal University of Petroleum Resources, P.M.B 1221, Effurun, Delta State, Nigeria.

Boisa Ndokiari
Department of Chemistry, Rivers State University, P.M.B 5080, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria.

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