An Overview on NO-Rich Diet for Lifestyle-Related Diseases

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An Overview on NO-Rich Diet for Lifestyle-Related Diseases

February 8, 2021 Medicine and Medical Science 0

Reduced production of nitric oxide (NO) due to obesity and endothelial dysfunction can be causally connected to the development of lifestyle-related diseases such as insulin resistance, heart disease ischemia, and hypertension. In such circumstances, the entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway could serve as a backup mechanism for NO generation instead of impaired NO synthase (NOS)-dependent NO generation by transmitting NO activities in various molecular types, including NO and protein S-nitrosothiols. Recent research has shown that dietary consumption of nitrate/nitrite-containing fruits and vegetables is an inexpensive and easy-to-use way to prevent insulin resistance and vascular endothelial dysfunction by increasing NO availability; a diet rich in NO can also prevent other lifestyle-related diseases, including osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other lifestyle-related diseases. This analysis offers a summary of our current awareness of NO generation and addresses its protection and preventive effects on lifestyle-related diseases via the entero-salivary pathway. Although the role of diet-derived NO operation in lifestyle-related diseases is complex and remains to be completely elucidated, as a result of synergistic effects with other nutrients present in vegetables, the intake of nitrate as a nutrient in vegetables may be beneficial to human health and would be recommended as a nutritional approach to preventing and treating lifestyle-related diseases.

Author (s) Details

Jun Kobayashi
Division of Pathophysiology, Department of Clinical Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Josai University, Saitama 350-0295, Japan.

Kazuo Ohtake
Division of Pathophysiology, Department of Clinical Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Josai University, Saitama 350-0295, Japan.

Hiroyuki Uchida
Division of Pathophysiology, Department of Clinical Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Josai University, Saitama 350-0295, Japan.

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