Consumption of Traditional Leafy Vegetables (Amaranthus hybridus) and Risk of Its Microbial Contamination in Daloa Town (Côte d’Ivoire): Global Perspective

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Consumption of Traditional Leafy Vegetables (Amaranthus hybridus) and Risk of Its Microbial Contamination in Daloa Town (Côte d’Ivoire): Global Perspective

July 29, 2020 Biological Science 0

Aim: It consisted to identify the different species of traditional leafy vegetables consumed, to follow
the technical process of production and to specifically evaluate the risk of microbial contamination of
Amaranth from urban production in Daloa.
Study Design: This study focuses on the consumption of traditional leafy vegetables.
Place and Duration of Study: University of Jean Lorougnon Guédé of Daloa, Côte d’Ivoire,
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Microbiology, UFR Agroforestry, BP 150 Daloa, between November
2018 and April 2019.
Methodology: On the study site, three planks of amaranth leave constituted a study block (sample).
A total of 18 samples were analyzed. Then, mature Amaranth, ready for sale and then consumed,
were subjected to microbiological characterization according to the standards.
Results: There are seven main species of leafy vegetables consumed by Daloa populations and
Amaranth is one of the most widely consumed leaves. The monitoring of production of these
vegetables revealed that many of the actors were adults (> 30 years old), dominated by the female
gender (63%) and illiterate (70%). The inputs were poultry manure, a mixture of dung and beef purse.
In addition, the technical production routes were empirical. Microbiological analyzes of Amaranth leaf
from selected areas showed a high level of bacterial contamination. Including indicator of general
pollution like mesophilic aerobic germs, yeasts and molds, enterobacteria and indicator of fecal origin
were isolated. It has been noticed the presence of pathogenic species such as Staphylococcus
aureus, Escherichia coli
and Salmonella sp in all productions.
Conclusion: Amaranth leaves produced in this area aren’t suitable for human consumption and could
create some sanitary risk.

Author (s) Details

Kouassi Kouassi Clément
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Microbiology (LBM), UFR Agroforestry, Jean Lorougnon Guédé University, BP 150 Daloa, Côte
d’Ivoire and Department of Food Science and Technology, Laboratory of Food Biotechnology and Microbiology, University of
Nangui Abrogoua, Abidjan, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire.

Attien Yao Paul (PhD)
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Microbiology (LBM), UFR Agroforestry, Jean Lorougnon Guédé University, BP 150 Daloa, Côte
d’Ivoire.

Coulibaly Bakary
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Microbiology (LBM), UFR Agroforestry, Jean Lorougnon Guédé University, BP 150 Daloa, Côte d’Ivoire.

Diomandé Siriki
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Microbiology (LBM), UFR Agroforestry, Jean Lorougnon Guédé University, BP 150 Daloa, Côte d’Ivoire.

Benie Comoé Koffi Donatien
Laboratory of Biotechnology and Food (LBF), University of Félix Houphouët Boigny, 01 BP V4 Abidjan 01, Côte d’Ivoire.

Konate Ibrahim (PhD)
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Microbiology (LBM), UFR Agroforestry, Jean Lorougnon Guédé University, BP 150 Daloa, Côte d’Ivoire.

Koffi-Nevry Rose
Department of Food Science and Technology, Laboratory of Food Biotechnology and Microbiology, University of Nangui Abrogoua, Abidjan, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire.

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