Critical Study on a Reclaimed Wastewater Allocation Optimization Model for Agricultural Irrigation

Science Press Release Distribution Services

Critical Study on a Reclaimed Wastewater Allocation Optimization Model for Agricultural Irrigation

March 11, 2021 Environment and Earth Sciences 0

Water shortages in Iraq are caused by climate change, deforestation, civil wars, political instability, and a high rate of population growth, all of which are expected to worsen in the future. Due to the importance of agriculture in Iraq, which accounts for more than 75% of total demand, a long-term agricultural water allocation scheme is needed to develop realistic and implementable water conservation measures that will help mitigate the impact of possible droughts and water shortages. In order to optimise the net profit, an agricultural irrigation reclaimed wastewater allocation optimization model was created to optimally distribute crops and reclaimed wastewater (RW) on cultivated farmlands.  The branch and reduce optimization navigator (BARON) in the general algebraic mathematical solver is used to solve the optimization model, which is formulated using mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) (GAMS). Using three types of reclaimed wastewater (RW): tertiary treated wastewater, secondary treated wastewater, and primary treated wastewater, the model maximises net farm income to assess the cultivated crop allocated to each farmland. The optimization model has two constraints: (1) reclaimed wastewater availability constraints and (2) irrigated farmlands availability constraints. With 5.5 105 m3/d of treated wastewater, the optimization model was applied to 7045 hectares of farms in the Alrustumia district, south of Baghdad, Iraq. Furthermore, the model’s versatility in selecting the highest economic crops to fulfil the maximum limit of the permissible cultivated area by each crop was aided by the broad variety of crops available when considering RW type A. In most cases, using tertiary treated wastewater provided the greatest net benefit, while using primary effluent provided the lowest net benefit since only low-value crops could be grown.

Author(s) Details

Ahmed A. Aljanabi
Former, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

Larry W. Mays
School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

Peter Fox
School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/MAGEES-V3/issue/view/53

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *