Current and Future Medical Professionals’ Attitudes towards Humanoid Robots

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Current and Future Medical Professionals’ Attitudes towards Humanoid Robots

January 9, 2021 Science and Technology 0

In recent areas, the scope of robot applications has been rapidly expanding across the globe. With the widespread introduction of robotics in the healthcare sector, understanding the attitudes of medical professionals towards using robots in different health-related contexts is important. In many healthcare environments, including counselling, operation, and care-taking, human-like robots are particularly used. Therefore, knowing the views of physicians on humanoid robots could highlight possibilities for setting up robot-assisted healthcare and related research activities. In addition, the views of current medical students may also provide comprehensive information. In healthcare environments, the future potential of such robots should be expected. This paper summarises the findings of a study carried out to assess the attitudes of current and prospective medical professionals towards humanoid robots using the Frankenstein Syndrome Questionnaire 30-item (FSQ). In terms of five variables, this scale measures attitudes towards humanoid robots, namely general negative attitudes, general positive attitudes, concept objections, faith in the makers of humanoid robots, and interpersonal fears. We also sampled doctors from various specialisations and specializations Third- and fourth-year medical school students in India. There were 125 participants from each group responding to the questionnaire. The findings indicate that there were generally more positive but also more negative attitudes towards humanoid robots from current medical professionals. This outcome can be explained by the fact that the types of attitudes evaluated in the FSQ do not generally convey opposite opinions directly. In order to explore the validity and reliability of the scale for use in Indian samples, future psychometric work is needed.

Author(s) Details

Jaishankar Bharatharaj
PAIR LAB, Research Centre for Robotics, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, India.

Praveen Regunathan Nirmala
PAIR LAB, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.

Senthil Kumar Sasthan Kutty
PAIR LAB, Research Centre for Robotics, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, India.

Chris Krägeloh
PAIR LAB, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.

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