Dietary Patterns in Alzheimer’s Disease. Preventive Role of L-carnitine and Supplementation with L-Carnitine and Its Derivatives

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Dietary Patterns in Alzheimer’s Disease. Preventive Role of L-carnitine and Supplementation with L-Carnitine and Its Derivatives

July 20, 2021 Disease and Health 0

Neurodegenerative illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), are difficult to avoid or cure in today’s health care. The goal of this chapter was to review the literature on the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by introducing a carnitine-rich diet, dietary carnitine supplements, and the MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) diet, which combines elements of the Mediterranean and DASH diets. L-carnitine (LC) is an essential component of the cell’s energy metabolism. In addition to necessary amino acids and microelements involved in endogenous carnitine production, a well-balanced diet contains a significant quantity of LC. Carnitine production is sufficient in healthy adults to prevent carnitine insufficiency symptoms. There are typically substantial problems in the functioning of the entire organism in people with mitochondrial malfunction, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) associated with extensive deterioration of brain regions. As the primary source of fats, the Mediterranean diet emphasises fruits and vegetables, grains, nuts, olive oil, and seeds. Low intake of red and processed meat, moderate consumption of fish and poultry, low to moderate intake of dairy products and alcohol, and low intake of red and processed meat. The inclusion of carnitine-rich foods, as well as the MIND diet or carnitine supplementation, may help AD patients function better in everyday life. It should be emphasised that proper diet is a key aspect of a healthy lifestyle that may play a role in promoting healthy, gradual, and beneficial ageing as well as delaying the onset of neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Author (S) Details

Alina Kepka
Department of Biochemistry, Radioimmunology and Experimental Medicine, The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, 04-730 Warsaw, Poland.

Agnieszka Ochocinska
Department of Biochemistry, Radioimmunology and Experimental Medicine, The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, 04-730 Warsaw, Poland.

Malgorzata Borzym-Kluczyk
Department of Pharmaceutical Biochemistry, Medical University of Bialystok, 15-089 Bialystok, Poland.

Ewa Skorupa
Department of Biochemistry, Radioimmunology and Experimental Medicine, The Children’s Memorial Health Institute, 04-730 Warsaw, Poland.

Beata Stasiewicz-Jarocka
Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University of Bialystok, 15-089 Bialystok, Poland.

Sylwia Chojnowska
Faculty of Health Sciences, Lomza State University of Applied Sciences, 18-400 Lomza, Poland.

Napoleon Waszkiewicz
Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Bialystok, 15-089 Bialystok, Poland.

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