Emphasizing the Human Carnivores Conflict in Wamba District, Samburu County, Kenya

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Emphasizing the Human Carnivores Conflict in Wamba District, Samburu County, Kenya

March 3, 2021 BIOLOGY 0

Conflict between humans, animals, and carnivores is a unifying theme in a dynamic issue of shared climate. This illustrates the interfacing, resulting in increased predation and cross-species disease transmission, as well as a negative economic effect on the populations involved. The aim of the study was to determine the extent and type of human-wildlife conflict in Kenya’s Samburu County. The knowledge was obtained in three societies between 2006 and 2009. 266 homesteads were chosen at random for interviews and characterization. Semi-structured questionnaires, direct field observations, and physical measurements were used in the survey. Genstat® Discovery (3rd Edition University of Reading) was used to evaluate the data, and chi-square was used to assess the levels of association. Motion sensor cameras were used to identify carnivores in the ecosystem, including lions (Panthera leo), leopards (Panthera pardus), hyenas (Crocuta crocuta and Hyaena hyena), jackals (Canis mesomelas), and wild dogs (Canis mesomelas) (Lycaon pictus). Predation of livestock occurred at a number of locations, including the homestead, the watering hole, and the grazing area. During the study period, carnivores killed 435 cattle, 801 sheep, 1138 goats, 189 donkeys, and 92 camels. Animal husbandry activities, such as poorly built animal sheds and livestock left in the field without headers or under the control of juveniles unable to scare the carnivores away, had a huge effect on the magnitude of depredation. During droughts, the dynamics of both wild and domestic ungulates are thought to be potential influence factors on carnivore diet composition, resulting in increased conflict. Pastoralism remains a major source of livelihood in Samburu County, which underpins the study’s importance and timeliness. This study also illustrates close contact between humans and animals, which may be useful for other aspects of human carnivore research, such as one health dimension.

Author (s) Details

Professor William O. Ogara
Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Nairobi, P.O.Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya.

Dr. Nduhiu Gitahi
Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Nairobi, P.O.Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya.

Mr. Alfred O. Mainga
Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Nairobi, P.O.Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya.

Eunice B. Ongoro
Department of Climate Change, University of Nairobi, P.O.Box 29053-00625, Nairobi, Kenya.

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