Experimental Approach to Chemical Evolution

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Experimental Approach to Chemical Evolution

April 23, 2021 Science and Technology 0

The formation of essential biomonomers from simpler molecules present in the prebiotic world, and their subsequent condensation to biopolymers, was the beginning of life processes. The effects of nucleic acid bases (thymine and uracil) at two separate concentrations (1 x 10-4 M and 1 x 10-5 M) on pH base adsorption on copper, cobalt, and silver ferrocyanides were studied over a pH range (10 – 10.0) at a temperature of 301°C on copper, cobalt, and silver ferrocyanides. The rate of adsorption was monitored spectrophotometrically by calculating the UV absorbance of nucleic acid base solutions at their respective maximum values. Both thymine and uracil had their highest adsorptions at neutral pH. At a neutral pH of 7.0 0.1 and a temperature of 301°C, the effects of concentrations on thymine and uracil adsorption on copper, cobalt, and silver ferrocyanides were investigated in the concentration range 1 x 10-4 M – 1 x 10-5 M. In the concentration range of 10-4 to 10-5 M of thymine and uracil solution, the interaction followed the Langmuir form of adsorption in general. For the adsorption of thymine on metal ferrocyanides, the order was CuFc > AgFc > CoFc, and for the adsorption of uracil, it was CuFc > CoFc > AgFc. The effects of salts on thymine and uracil adsorption on metal ferrocyanides have also been investigated. The interaction of insoluble metal ferrocyanides with biomolecules may have formed metal complexes or aided the formation of biopolymers in a changing setting. Adsorption of dl – aspartic acid, dl – leucine, dl – lysine, and dl – serine on halosite, hectorite, illite, kaolinite, nantronite, and montmorillonite clay minerals, as well as adsorption of glycine and ß- alanine on nickel, cobalt, and cadmium ferrocyanides.

Author (s) Details

Brij Bhushan Tewari
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Guyana, P.O.Box: 101110, Georgetown, Guyana.

Davendradat Doodnauth
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Guyana, P.O.Box: 101110, Georgetown, Guyana.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/NICST-V11/article/view/681

 

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