Geomatics Techniques for Monitoring the Retreat of Coastal Sandy Systems: Somo Beach (Cantabrian Coast, Spain, 1875–2017)

Science Press Release Distribution Services

Geomatics Techniques for Monitoring the Retreat of Coastal Sandy Systems: Somo Beach (Cantabrian Coast, Spain, 1875–2017)

July 22, 2021 Physical Science 0

Geomatics tools (historical cartography, photogrammetry, topography, and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS)) were used to examine the dynamics and evolution of a coastal sandy system over the last 142 years (1875–2017). The continuous beach–dune system is a particularly active restricting sand barrier that closes an estuary system where coastal infrastructure and dwellings are damaged. Historical cartography, digitalizing the 5-m-level curve on maps from 1875, 1908, 1920, 1950, and 1985; photogrammetric flights from 1985, 1988, and 2001 without calibration certificates, digitalizing only the upper part of the sandy front; and historical cartography, digitalizing the 5-m-level curve on maps from 1875, 1908, 1920, 1950, and 1985. Photogrammetric flights in 2005, 2007, 2010, and 2014, using photogrammetric restitution of the 5-m-level curve; topo-bathymetric profiles made monthly with a total station between 1988 and 1993; a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) since 2011 using two annual measurements; and meteorological data from 1985 to 2017. Winter storms with big waves and swells greater than 6 m, combining with times with a high tidal range of over 100 and periods with a large number of intense storms, caused the sandy complex to retreat. Between December 2013 and March 2014, the retreat was 8 metres. At Somo Beach, the overall change in the coastline between 1875 and 2017 was roughly 415 metres of retreat. Between 1999 and 2014, erosive processes on the foredune resulted in the outcropping of the rock face becoming a continuous rocky cliff without sands. Combining geomatic approaches with future TLS data sets may increase our understanding of shoreline changes in the context of sea level and global changes, allowing us to better understand recent coastal evolution and its ramifications for the human environment. To understand the evolution and erosive rhythms on the foredune, the integration and complementarities of multiple methodologies and sources, such as historical mapping, photogrammetric flight series, and TLS, were quite valuable.

Author (S) Details

Dr. José Juan de Sanjosé Blasco
Departamento de Expresión gráfica, Escuela Politécnica, Universidad de Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain.

Dr. Manuel Gómez-Lende
Departamento de Geografía, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid, Spain.

Manuel Sánchez-Fernández
Departamento de Expresión gráfica, Escuela Politécnica, Universidad de Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain.

Enrique Serrano-Cañadas
Departamento de Geografía, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid, Spain.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/NUPSR-V8/article/view/1755

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *