Investigating the Prevalence of Environment Related Diseases in Peri-Urban Areas of Ogbomoso, Nigeria

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Investigating the Prevalence of Environment Related Diseases in Peri-Urban Areas of Ogbomoso, Nigeria

February 1, 2021 Environment and Earth Science 0

Aim: The research explores the frequency, prevalence, gender and spatial dimensions of four major communicable diseases-malaria, typhoid, cholera and diarhoea-in the sense of current socio-physical and housing environmental conditions.

Place and duration: The study was conducted between February and July 2008 in eighteen peri-urban communities in Ogbomoso, Nigeria.

Study Design: The study incorporated a social survey of the perception of residents and six months of hospital records of clinically diagnosed diseases linked to the environment.

Methodology: We used both primary and secondary data. In selected neighbourhoods, a total of 200 questionnaires were randomly administered to household heads to collect information on accommodation, the socio-economic characteristics of household heads, and their perception of the health effects of urban invasion. Data on clinically identified environment-related diseases was collected from six purposefully chosen health institutions. Inferential statistics were submitted to the collected data. The research is based on the hypothesis that health impacts emerge from or are exacerbated in the cities of developing countries by dangerous land use practices, population pressure on housing, lack of infrastructure and basic services such as water and sanitation, electricity, and inadequate environmental sanitation.

Results: A general shortage of essential infrastructural facilities and services was noticed in the report. While houses were mainly of the form of bungalow (72 percent) and occupied by the owner (63.5 percent), home accessibility was generally bad. A large number of houses (26.5 percent) had no toilet, while nearly 99 percent of respondents did not have access to pipe-borne water, with 80 percent using nearby vacant land as a waste dump. Malaria (53.5%) and typhoid diseases were the most common diseases (42.2 percent ). In the Abaa community in the Surulere Local Government Area, only cases of cholera (2.2 percent) and diarrhoea (2.2 percent) were reported. In all cases, women were more prone to malaria and typhoid fever (56.2% and 61.2%) than their male counterparts. It is proposed to prepare layout plans and close monitoring of peri-urban growth and to urgently provide basic facilities and services.

Author (s) Details

Adeboyejo A. Thompson
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria.

Dr. (Mrs) Olajoke Abolade
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria.

Temitope Oshinowo
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria.

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