Investigations on Exhaust Emissions of a Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engine with Alternative Fuels

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Investigations on Exhaust Emissions of a Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engine with Alternative Fuels

August 24, 2021 Environment and Earth Science 0

The search for alternative fuels has become necessary in light of the rapid depletion of conventional fuels. Because they are renewable, alcohols and vegetable oils are important diesel substitutes. Vegetable oils have a calorific value and cetane number that are comparable to diesel fuel. Alcohols have the advantage of having a high volatility and having oxygen in their chemical structure or makeup. Vegetable oils, on the other hand, have the disadvantages of high viscosity and moderate volatility. Alcohols have a low cetane number (a measure of the quality of combustion in a diesel engine) and a poor calorific value. As a result, vegetable oils and alcohols necessitate a diesel engine with a low heat rejection (LHR). It can solve the problem of vegetable oils and alcohols combusting. Exhaust emissions from various variants of low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engines, such as the LHR-1 engine (ceramic coated engine), LHR-2 engine (air gap insulated engine), and LHR-3 engine (combination of LHR-1 and LHR-2 engine) using carbureted butanol and unrefined jatropha oil, were investigated (CJO). As a result, the benefits of vegetable oil and alcohol can be used to reduce engine pollution. At full load operation, exhaust emissions of particulate matter, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and aldehydes from several LHR engine designs were measured. a traditional engine (CE). Particulate matter and NOx were measured using an AVL Smoke metre and a Netel Chromatograph NOx analyzer, respectively, at full load operation. At full load operation, aldehydes such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were assessed using a wet approach known as the dinitrophenyle (DNPH) method. With carbureted butanol, LHR variants of the engine reduced exhaust pollutants significantly. In different variants of the engine, increasing the injection pressure reduced emissions even more.

Author(s) Details

Dr. M. V. S. Murali Krishna
Mechanical Engineering Department, Chaitanya Bharathi Institute of Technology, Gandipet, Hyderabad-500 075, Telangana State, India.

Dr. V. V. R. Seshagiri Rao
Mechanical Engineering Department, Chaitanya Bharathi Institute of Technology, Gandipet, Hyderabad-500 075, Telangana State, India.

Dr. R. P. Chowdary
Mechanical Engineering Department, Chaitanya Bharathi Institute of Technology, Gandipet, Hyderabad-500 075, Telangana State, India.

Dr. N. Janardhan
Mechanical Engineering Department, Chaitanya Bharathi Institute of Technology, Gandipet, Hyderabad-500 075, Telangana State, India.

Mr. N. Venkateswara Rao
Mechanical Engineering Department, Chaitanya Bharathi Institute of Technology, Gandipet, Hyderabad-500 075, Telangana State, India.

Dr. T. Ratna Reddy
Mechanical Engineering Department, Chaitanya Bharathi Institute of Technology, Gandipet, Hyderabad-500 075, Telangana State, India.

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