Latest News on Emotional Intelligence : July – 2020

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Latest News on Emotional Intelligence : July – 2020

July 25, 2020 Medical Science 0

Some historical and scientific issues related to research on emotional intelligence

In the past decade, the concept of emotional intelligence (EI) has emerged as a potential new construct for explaining behavioral variance not accounted for by traditional measures of general academic intelligence or personality. EI researchers credit E. L. Thorndike as the first to propose such a construct when he suggested that social intelligence is independent of abstract or academic intelligence. The current paper traces the historical roots of social intelligence and the current scientific status of emotional intelligence. It appears that emotional intelligence, as a concept related to occupational success, exists outside the typical scientific domain. Much of the data necessary for demonstrating the unique association between EI and work‐related behavior appears to reside in proprietary databases, preventing rigorous tests of the measurement devices or of their unique predictive value. For those reasons, any claims for the value of EI in the work setting cannot be made under the scientific mantle. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [1]

 

Emotional intelligence as a standard intelligence

The authors have claimed that emotional intelligence (EI) meets traditional standards for an intelligence (J. D. Mayer, D. R. Caruso, & P. Salovey, 1999). R. D. Roberts, M. Zeidner, and G. Matthews (see record 2001-10055-001) questioned whether that claim was warranted. The central issue raised by Roberts et al. concerning Mayer et al. (1999) is whether there are correct answers to questions on tests purporting to measure EI as a set of abilities. To address this issue (and others), the present authors briefly restate their view of intelligence, emotion, and EI. They then present arguments for the reasonableness of measuring EI as an ability, indicate that correct answers exist, and summarize recent data suggesting that such measures are, indeed, reliable. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) [2]

 

The intelligence of emotional intelligence

Emotional intelligence is a type of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one’s own and others’ emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use the information to guide one’s thinking and actions (Salovey & Mayer, 1990). We discuss (a) whether intelligence is an appropriate metaphor for the construct, and (b) the abilities and mechanisms that may underlie emotional intelligence. [3]

 

Emotional Intelligence, Sexual Functioning, and Subjective Sexual Well-being in Portuguese Adults

Not many studies exist that relate emotional intelligence with sexual variables, such as sexual functioning and subjective sexual well-being. In order to fill the gap in the research, we developed this study with the following objectives. First, we aim to assess levels of emotional intelligence, sexual functioning, and subjective sexual well-being in a large sample of Portuguese adults. Second, we seek to compare differences in emotional intelligence, sexual functioning, and subjective sexual well-being between genders and age groups. Finally our goal is to determine the association between emotional intelligence, and sexual functioning and subjective sexual well-being. The sample consists of 1,421 individuals, who are predominantly female (818, 57.6%), between the ages of 18 and 83 years. The average age of participants is 38.76 years old (SD = 13.67). We use Schutte’s Emotional Intelligence Scale, the Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, and the Subjective Sexual Well-being Questionnaire as research instruments. Overall results identify high levels of emotional intelligence, sexual functioning, and subjective sexual well-being. Significant differences concerning emotional intelligence are found between genders (women present higher scores than men), age (older participants demonstrate higher scores than younger participants), and also for sexual functioning and sexual subjective well-being (men present higher scores than women). There are significant, but mild, levels of association between emotional intelligence and sexual variables. These results allow us to better inform professionals who work, either in the area of emotional intelligence, or in the field of sexuality. [4]

Emotional Intelligence, Spiritual Intelligence, Self-esteem and Self Control of Substance Abuse

Background: This study aims to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence, spiritual intelligence and self-esteem, and self-control on men with addiction in rehabilitation centers of Tehran.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study sampling 200 men. From 12 treatment and rehabilitation centers in Tehran, 4 were randomly selected and fifty people from each center aged 20 to 50 with at least two years of addiction history were picked. Instruments used were: Eysenck Self-esteem Scale (ESI), Bradbury-Greaves Emotional Intelligence test, Abdullah Zadeh Spiritual Intelligence test and the Personal Control Scale (PCS).

Results: A positive relationship was found between emotional intelligence, spiritual intelligence, self-esteem and substance abuse self-control (r=0.25, 0.21 and 0.24 at a level of confidence =0.001, respectively).

Conclusion: Promotion of emotional intelligence, spiritual intelligence and self-esteem may prove useful in control of substance abuse in men. [5]

 

Reference

[1] Landy, F.J., 2005. Some historical and scientific issues related to research on emotional intelligence. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 26(4), pp.411-424.

[2] Mayer, J.D., Salovey, P., Caruso, D.R. and Sitarenios, G., 2001. Emotional intelligence as a standard intelligence.

[3] Mayer, J.D. and Salovey, P., 1993. The intelligence of emotional intelligence.

[4] Silva, P., Pereira, H., Esgalhado, G., Monteiro, S., Afonso, R. and Loureiro, M. (2016) “Emotional Intelligence, Sexual Functioning, and Subjective Sexual Well-being in Portuguese Adults”, Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 15(1), pp. 1-11. doi: 10.9734/BJESBS/2016/23481.

[5] Alaei, S., Zabihi, R., Ahmadi, A., Doosti, A. and Mehdi Saberi, S. (2017) “Emotional Intelligence, Spiritual Intelligence, Self-esteem and Self Control of Substance Abuse”, International Neuropsychiatric Disease Journal, 9(4), pp. 1-8. doi: 10.9734/INDJ/2017/33461.

 

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