Latest Research News on Farmers Perceptions : May 2020

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Latest Research News on Farmers Perceptions : May 2020

May 14, 2020 Agricultural Extension 0

Technology characteristics, farmers’ perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone

The objective of this paper is to test the hypothesis that farmer perceptions of technology-specific characteristics significantly condition technology adoption decisions. Earlier adoption studies have not considered this in the analysis of the determinants of adoption decisions. The omission of farmers’ evaluation of technology-specific attributes may bias the results of factors conditioning adoption choices. [1]

Farmers’ perceptions and adoption of new agricultural technology: evidence from analysis in Burkina Faso and Guinea, West Africa

Economists investigating consumer demand have accumulated considerable evidence showing that consumers generally have subjective preferences for characteristics of products and that their demand for products is significantly affected by their perceptions of the product’s attributes. However, the role of farmers’ preferences in adoption decisions have received very limited attention in adoption studies conducted by economists. This paper tests the hypothesis that farmers’ perceptions of technology characteristics significantly affect their adoption decisions. The analysis, conducted with Tobit models of modern sorghum and rice varietal technologies in Burkina Faso and Guinea, respectively, strongly supports this hypothesis. Our results provide a strong case for future adoption studies to expand the range of variables used away from the broad socio-economic, demographic and institutional factors to include farmers’ subjective perceptions of the characteristics of new agricultural technologies. [2]

Smallholder farmers’ perceptions of climate change and conservation agriculture: evidence from Zambia

Actors involved in promoting conservation agriculture have often not taken into account perceptions of smallholder farmers of climate change and conservation agriculture as an adaptation strategy. This study documents smallholder farmers’ perceptions of climate change and conservation agriculture. Most farmers attributed climate change to supernatural forces. Smallholder farmers’ perceptions related to floods and droughts were significantly associated with adoption of conservation agriculture. The extent to which smallholder farmers perceived conservation agriculture as a climate change adaptation strategy was very low. This suggests existence of other important reasons for practicing conservation agriculture than adaptation to climate change. Policy implications of the study are: conservation agriculture projects should not only focus on technical approaches to increase adoption rates but also consider social aspects such as perceptions that are equally important in conservation agriculture. Inclusion of climate change communication to facilitate exchange of climatic information that could enable smallholder farmers relate to conservation agriculture as an adaptation strategy is essentia l [3]

Farmers’ Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the Cocoa Disease and Pest Control Programme (CODAPEC) in Ghana and Its Effects on Poverty Reduction

The study examined the contribution of the Cocoa Disease and Pest Control Programme (CODAPEC), which is a cocoa production-enhancing government policy, to reducing poverty and raising the living standards of cocoa farmers in Ghana. One hundred and fifty (150) cocoa farmers were randomly selected from five communities in the Bibiani-Anhwiaso-Bekwai district of the Western Region of Ghana and interviewed using structured questionnaires. Just over half of the farmers (53%) perceived the CODAPEC programme as being effective in controlling pests and diseases, whilst 56.6% felt that their yields and hence livelihoods had improved. In some cases pesticides or fungicides were applied later in the season than recommended and this had a detrimental effect on yields. [4]

Understanding Farmers’ Perceptions and Adaptations to Climate Change and Variability in Rice Production at the Kaski and Chitwan Districts, Nepal

This study was conducted to access perception of farmers about climate change particularly to access the effect of climatic variables on yield of rice crops based on regression model for 1999-2013 climatic data and yield data. The other objective include to learn adaptation strategies to climate change and assess factor influencing adaptation strategies adopted by farmers in hill (Kaski) and terai (Chitwan) of Nepal. Primary data were obtained through Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and field survey. Descriptive statistics, time series regression model, logit model and seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) model were used. About 87.5 percent of the respondent perceived the change in weather parameter such as temperature and rainfall. A majority of respondents (96%) perceived the increase in temperature and 83% respondents from Kaski perceived decreasing rainfall trend whereas about 86% respondents from Chitwan perceived increasing rainfall trend. [5]

Reference

[1]  Adesina, A.A. and Zinnah, M.M., 1993. Technology characteristics, farmers’ perceptions and adoption decisions: A Tobit model application in Sierra Leone. Agricultural economics, 9(4), pp.297-311.

[2]  Adesina, A.A. and Baidu-Forson, J., 1995. Farmers’ perceptions and adoption of new agricultural technology: evidence from analysis in Burkina Faso and Guinea, West Africa. Agricultural economics, 13(1), pp.1-9.

[3] Nyanga, P.H., Johnsen, F.H. and Aune, J.B., 2011. Smallholder farmers’ perceptions of climate change and conservation agriculture: evidence from Zambia.

[4] Kumi, E. and Daymond, A. (2015) “Farmers’ Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the Cocoa Disease and Pest Control Programme (CODAPEC) in Ghana and Its Effects on Poverty Reduction”, Journal of Experimental Agriculture International, 7(5), pp. 257-274. doi: 10.9734/AJEA/2015/16388.

[5] Khanal, S. and Ram Kattel, R. (2017) “Understanding Farmers’ Perceptions and Adaptations to Climate Change and Variability in Rice Production at the Kaski and Chitwan Districts, Nepal”, Asian Research Journal of Agriculture, 3(2), pp. 1-12. doi: 10.9734/ARJA/2017/29761.

 

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