Latest Research News on Stem Cuttings : Nov 2020

Science Press Release Distribution Services

Latest Research News on Stem Cuttings : Nov 2020

November 20, 2020 AGRICULTURE 0

Rooting of stem cuttings of Eucalyptus: A rooting inhibitor in adult tissue

The available physiological evidence suggests that ontogenetic ageing of E. Grandis seedlings involves a direct and quantitative association between decreased rooting ability of stem cuttings and increased levels of a rooting inhibitor in the tissue forming the base of the cutting. As detected by bioassay, this inhibitor is present only in adult tissue, which very rarely forms roots from stem cuttings. It is absent in easily rooted seedling stems of all Eucalyptus species tested, but it is also absent in the easily rooted adult tissue of the exceptional species E. deglupta. The ability of seedling cuttings of E. deglupta to root very easily in water provides an appropriate bioassay for monitoring the presence of inhibitor in other Eucalyptus species. [1]

Effect of indole butyric acid (IBA) on stem cuttings of Shorea leprosula

The application of auxin (indole butyric acid, IBA) significantly increased the rate of root emergence in single node leafy stem cuttings of Shorea leprosula taken from 10-month-old potted seedlings. A range of IBA doses (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 μg IBA per cutting) were tested and 20 μg per cutting was found to be the best with 70% of cuttings rooted within 12 weeks. Higher doses resulted in less rooting success. IBA application also enhanced the number of roots developed on each cutting. The mean accumulated number of roots per rooted cutting in Week 10 on cuttings treated with 20, 40, 60 and 80 μg IBA was 5.05, 5.26, 4.82 and 4.80 respectively compared with 3.11 for cuttings treated with only a 50% ethanol and water mixture. [2]

Abscisic-acid-stimulated rooting of stem cuttings

Abscisic acid (ABA) has been found to stimulate rooting of stem cuttings of mung beans and English ivy. ABA partially overcame the inhibitory effect of gibberellic acid on root formation of mung bean cuttings but at the concentrations used did not overcome the inhibitory effect of kinetin on root formation. [3]

Effects of Different Auxin (IBA) Concentrations and Planting-Beds on Rooting Grape Cuttings (Vitis vinifera)

Aims: Vitis vinifera is a grape species and native to the Mediterranean region and east to northern Iran. The present research was carried out in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of four concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) (0; 2000; 4000; and 6000 mg/l) and three planting beds (agricultural soils, sandy, and mixture of agricultural soils and sand) on rooting grape cuttings in institute of agriculture at Zabol University, (Iran).

Methodology: The experimental design was a factorial design in randomized complete block with three replicates.

Results: Results showed that different auxin and planting bed treatments had a significant influence on grape rooting. The maximum number of roots, root length, and root fresh and dry weight was obtained by applying 4000 mg/l IBA. The significant effect of planting bed treatments was found in studying traits, so that maximum number of roots, root length, and root fresh and dry weight was obtained in mixture of agricultural soils and sand planting beds. Studied traits significantly affected by an interaction effect of IBA and cuttings beds, so that maximum number of roots, root length, and root dry weight was obtained by using 2000 mg/l IBA + sandy planting bed, and maximum root fresh weight was obtained by using 4000 mg/l IBA + sandy planting bed. [4]

Effect of Cutting Type and IBA on Rooting and Growth of Citron (Citrus medica L)

This study was conducted during 2012 and 2013 season to investigate the effect of IBA on rooting of citron stem cuttings (Citrus medica Linnaeus) Corsian cultivar.

The cutting referred to the location from which it was taken (tip, medial and bottom).

Cuttings were taken and exposed to different IBA doses (0, 500, 1000, 2000 ppm).They were planted in greenhouse in mixed media (1 part peat moss + 2 parts sand) to increase rooting success percentage in the stem cuttings of (Citrus medica Linnaeus) Corsian cultivar , improving their vegetative growth, and  investigate the response of stem cuttings of citron to Auxin IBA concentrations.

The results indicated that the type of cuttings were different in rooting capacity, shoot length  content. Also increase the concentrations of IBA increased rooting percentage, shoot diameter, number of leaves, length of roots and leaves relative chlorophyll content, significantly form compared with control treatment under level 5%. The result indicated that the medial cutting parts with 500 and 1000 ppm perform better in terms of root percentage(100%),and medial type cutting with500 IBA ppm in length of shoots(23.08 cm), shoot diameter(16.33 mm) , number of leaves (16.44 leaves plant), length of roots(17.92cm). [5]

Reference

[1] Paton, D.M., Willing, R.R., Nicholls, W. and Pryor, L.D., 1970. Rooting of stem cuttings of Eucalyptus: a rooting inhibitor in adult tissue. Australian Journal of Botany, 18(2), pp.175-183.

[2] Aminah, H., Dick, J.M., Leakey, R.R.B., Grace, J. and Smith, R.I., 1995. Effect of indole butyric acid (IBA) on stem cuttings of Shorea leprosula. Forest Ecology and Management, 72(2-3), pp.199-206.

[3] Chin, T.Y., Meyer, M.M. and Beevers, L., 1969. Abscisic-acid-stimulated rooting of stem cuttings. Planta, 88(2), pp.192-196.

[4] Galavi, M., Karimian, M. and Mousavi, S. (2013) “Effects of Different Auxin (IBA) Concentrations and Planting-Beds on Rooting Grape Cuttings (Vitis vinifera)”, Annual Research & Review in Biology, 3(4), pp. 517-523. Available at: https://journalarrb.com/index.php/ARRB/article/view/24777 (Accessed: 20November2020).

[5] Kako Al-Zebari, S. and Al-Brifkany, A.-A. (2014) “Effect of Cutting Type and IBA on Rooting and Growth of Citron (Citrus medica L)”, Journal of Experimental Agriculture International, 5(2), pp. 134-138. doi: 10.9734/AJEA/2015/10973.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *