Progressive Freeze Concentration of Coconut Water and use of Partial Ice Melting Method for Yield Improvement: A Recent Study

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Progressive Freeze Concentration of Coconut Water and use of Partial Ice Melting Method for Yield Improvement: A Recent Study

September 6, 2021 Agricultural and Food Science 0

Coconut water is a highly nutritious liquid food produced by the desiccated coconut industry as a by-product. Freeze concentration is the best method for concentrating coconut water since the low-temperature operation does not affect the original quality of the coconut water. The available FC methods are Suspension Freeze-Concentration (SFC) and Progressive Freeze-Concentration (PFC), with SFC being more sophisticated and expensive than PFC. PFC is a new freeze concentration technology that uses a simple system to concentrate liquid food. The decreased product yield of PFC compared to SFC is a restriction, which can be solved using the partial ice-melting approach. For PFC, a basic cylindrical apparatus consisting of a sample tank, agitator system, and chilling bath (at -23°C 2°C temperature) was utilised. The agitator speed of the apparatus and the dipping speed of the sample vessel had a direct impact on the liquid product’s final concentration. PFC agitator speed of 290 rpm and dipping speed of 1.3cmh-1 were described as the ideal operating conditions for the PFC apparatus utilised in this investigation to produce the greatest concentration. Coconut water was concentrated up to Brix 8.5° using optimal agitation and dipping speeds from a starting concentration of Brix 3.5°. PFC coconut water had a total yield of 73.56 percent, a concentration ratio of 2.42, an ice phase concentration of 0.7°, and an effective partition coefficient of 0.08. By recovering initial ice fractions with high solute concentrations, the partial melting process was successfully studied, and the total yield was enhanced by up to 80%. PFC is the most ideal method for concentrating coconut water without affecting its original quality, and it uses a basic system that is less expensive than SFC.

Author (S) Details

J. A. E. C. Jayawardena
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Gangodawila, Nugegoda, Colombo, Sri Lanka.

M. P. G. Vanniarachchi
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Gangodawila, Nugegoda, Colombo, Sri Lanka.

M. A. J. Wansapala
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Gangodawila, Nugegoda, Colombo, Sri Lanka.

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