Quality of Drinking Water in Benin (West Africa): Analysis of the Potential Use of the “Songhaï” Ceramic Filter

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Quality of Drinking Water in Benin (West Africa): Analysis of the Potential Use of the “Songhaï” Ceramic Filter

June 16, 2021 Environment and Earth Science 0

Benin’s public health issues stem from a variety of sources. Domestic water plays an important role in households, but it is contaminated by biological and physicochemical pollutants. Household water purification devices, such as ceramic filters, can be used as a solution. “Filtre Songha” is a ceramic filter that is simple and easy to use and is sold in Benin. The purpose of this research is to examine the use of the “Filtre Songha” in the treatment of domestic water in a periurban area of Porto-Novo (Benin). A collective well and a pond in Porto-5th Novo’s district were used to collect samples. Before and after filtration, physicochemical and bacteriological parameters were measured. The results showed that the use of filters resulted in a 97.5 percent reduction in total coliform in well water and a 99.05 percent reduction in water from the lagoon. In both cases, the reduction in Escherichia coli and fecal streptococci is 100 percent. Given the device’s dependability and accessibility as a result of its lifetime use, this device can be recommended to households for drinking water, particularly for children under the age of five, who are the most vulnerable to water-borne diseases. At the conclusion of this study, it is discovered that using the “Filtre Songha” allows for a significant improvement in the microbiological properties of water. Later research is required to improve the filtration speed of the “Filtre Song-ha.” More research is needed to improve the filtration time of this device.

Author (s) Details

Roch Christian Johnson
Laboratory of Hygiene, Sanitation, Toxicology and Environmental Health, Interfaculty Center of Training and Research in Environment for the Sustainable Development, University of Abomey-Calavi (CIFRED-UAC), Cotonou, Benin.

Gratien Boni
Laboratory of Hygiene, Sanitation, Toxicology and Environmental Health, Interfaculty Center of Training and Research in Environment for the Sustainable Development, University of Abomey-Calavi (CIFRED-UAC), Cotonou, Benin.

Cyriaque Degbey
Regional Institute of Public Health, University of Abomey-Calavi, Cotonou, Benin.

Karel Togbe
Laboratory of Hygiene, Sanitation, Toxicology and Environmental Health, Interfaculty Center of Training and Research in Environment for the Sustainable Development, University of Abomey-Calavi (CIFRED-UAC), Cotonou, Benin.

Hermione Amoukpo
Laboratory of Hygiene, Sanitation, Toxicology and Environmental Health, Interfaculty Center of Training and Research in Environment for the Sustainable Development, University of Abomey-Calavi (CIFRED-UAC), Cotonou, Benin.

Michel Boko
Laboratory of Hygiene, Sanitation, Toxicology and Environmental Health, Interfaculty Center of Training and Research in Environment for the Sustainable Development, University of Abomey-Calavi (CIFRED-UAC), Cotonou, Benin.

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