Study on Exploring Family Multi-Type Maltreatment, Social Support, and Externalizing and Internalizing Problems among Asian and Asian American College Students

Science Press Release Distribution Services

Study on Exploring Family Multi-Type Maltreatment, Social Support, and Externalizing and Internalizing Problems among Asian and Asian American College Students

September 11, 2021 Humanities and Social Sciences 0

Childhood exposure to familial violence has a negative long-term impact on one’s life. In Asian communities in the United States and Asian countries, this relationship is understudied. The goals of this study are to look at the long-term effects of maltreatment, such as interparental violence and child maltreatment, on the externalising and internalising problems that Asian and Asian American college students face, as well as to look into the protective effects of social support against the negative effects of family maltreatment. We studied the effects of familial abuse on issue outcomes and the function of social support in a survey of 542 college students from Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan, and the United States. Students who were exposed to both types of family maltreatment (i.e., intraparental violence and child maltreatment) had more externalising problems than those who were only exposed to one form of family maltreatment, but there were no differences in internalising behaviours. Social support from parents and peers had direct, not moderating or mediating, effects on externalising and internalising difficulties. Externalizing behaviours were reduced in those who received parental support, while peer support had no effect. Those who received parental and peer support, on the other hand, had lower levels of internalising mental health concerns. Surprisingly, men showed higher signs of mental illness than women. Dual harm worsens behavioural difficulties, yet family support can assist Asian and Asian American college students repair the damage. The link between abuse and negative outcomes was consistent across countries, implying that psychological processes are shared.

Author (S) Details

Yoko Baba
Justice Studies Department, San José State University, San José, CA, U.S.A.

James D. Lee
Faculty Affairs, San José State University, San José, CA, U.S.A.

Michael E. Vallerga
Justice Studies Department, San José State University, San José, CA, U.S.A.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/STHSS-V5/article/view/3283

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *