Study on Preparation and Optimization of Fast Dissolving HPMC/PVA Blended films of Loperamide Hydrochloride

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Study on Preparation and Optimization of Fast Dissolving HPMC/PVA Blended films of Loperamide Hydrochloride

August 24, 2021 Pharmaceutical 0

Because identifying new chemical entities is a difficult, expensive, and time-consuming process, the current tendency is to create and develop better drug delivery mechanisms for existing medications. Fast dissolving oral films have recently been introduced to the market, attracting the attention of many pharmaceutical companies due to their numerous advantages over other oral dosage forms, including ease of administration, better patient compliance, rapid drug absorption, and rapid onset of action with instant bioavailability. Aside from these benefits, youngsters, the elderly, and bedridden patients who have difficulty swallowing tablets or capsules can benefit from quick dissolving oral films. Fast-dissolving oral films comprising breath strips, confectionery, and dental care treatments were initially developed, but it has now grown into an unique and widely accepted way for delivering both OTC and prescription medications. As an alternative to fast-acting pills, fast-acting films are gaining popularity. When the films come into contact with a wet surface, such as the tongue, they breakdown in a matter of seconds, allowing the user to eat the food without needing any additional liquid. This ease of use has both a marketing and a compliance benefit for patients. The drug avoids gastrointestinal degradation and the first-pass effect because it is absorbed directly into the systemic circulation. The mouth dissolving film for Loperamide hydrochloride is made by solvent casting. Loperamide hydrochloride as an anti-diarrheal, HPMC-E50, HPMC-E15-LV, and PVA as film forming polymers, propylene glycol as a plasticizer, sodium starch glycolate (2-8%) as super disintegrant, lemon oil (2-5%) as a flavouring agent, citric acid (2-6%) as a Saliva Stimulating Agent, and methylparaben (0.015%) as a preservative were. The independent variables were tensile strength, disintegration time, and percentage drug dissolution, while the response variables were tensile strength, disintegration time, and percentage drug dissolution. The formulations were evaluated based on mass uniformity, thickness, percent drug content, folding endurance, surface pH, moisture uptake, percent swelling, percentage elongation, tensile strength, in vitro disintegration time, and in vitro percentage drug dissolution. Loperamide has been identified as a promising candidate for use in the creation of Fast Mouth Dissolving Films. Loperamide oral films are made using a simple and cost-effective solvent casting method. The super disintegrants utilised in this investigation thought it was acceptable. There was no physicochemical interaction found in FT-IR testing of drug-excipient compatibility. The oral films obtained were clear, had enough physical strength, and had a good disintegration time. All mixtures had a better release profile than pure medications in in vitro dissolution tests. The best formulation among the others is film formulation F7, which has a blend of HPMC E15 and PVA film formers, according to the test results.

Author (S) Details

Poonam Patil
Konkan Gyanpeeth Rahul Dharkar College of Pharmacy & Research Institute, Karjat, Raigad Mumbai, (M.H.), India.

Vaishali Jadhav
Konkan Gyanpeeth Rahul Dharkar College of Pharmacy & Research Institute, Karjat, Raigad Mumbai, (M.H.), India.

Rasika Rane
Konkan Gyanpeeth Rahul Dharkar College of Pharmacy & Research Institute, Karjat, Raigad Mumbai, (M.H.), India.

Amruta Shelar
Konkan Gyanpeeth Rahul Dharkar College of Pharmacy & Research Institute, Karjat, Raigad Mumbai, (M.H.), India.

Sainath Nair
Konkan Gyanpeeth Rahul Dharkar College of Pharmacy & Research Institute, Karjat, Raigad Mumbai, (M.H.), India.

Aniruddha Gurchal
Konkan Gyanpeeth Rahul Dharkar College of Pharmacy & Research Institute, Karjat, Raigad Mumbai, (M.H.), India.

Sujay Kanitkar
Konkan Gyanpeeth Rahul Dharkar College of Pharmacy & Research Institute, Karjat, Raigad Mumbai, (M.H.), India.

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