Study on Reducing Maternal Mortality from Direct Obstetric Causes during 2013 in Sudan

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Study on Reducing Maternal Mortality from Direct Obstetric Causes during 2013 in Sudan

September 12, 2021 Medicine and Medical Science 0

Despite international agreements to improve maternal health, measuring, monitoring, and comparing mortality rates remains challenging. In 2013, researchers in Sudan conducted a study to see how maternal mortality from direct obstetric causes (obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, and sepsis) changed after proper therapies.

Sudan has been doing MDR in both facilities and communities since 2009. (maternal death review). At the national and state levels, MDRCs (Maternal Death Review Committees) were established. A focal point was designated to each state, health facility, and locality. MDs (maternal deaths) were notified via phone, and all maternal deaths were assessed in an organised way. Maternal mortality (MM) is caused by obstetric haemorrhage, hypertensive diseases, and sepsis. Recommendations have been created to prevent MM. All states have approved and implemented management guidelines, care provider training, and the availability of necessary prerequisites for these circumstances. The MD was examined and analysed using SPSS version 18.0, and the resulting MMR (maternal mortality ratio) was compared to the years 2010-2012 to see if there was any improvement. In 2013, out of a total of 645,881 LBs, 1,110 maternal fatalities were reported (live births). With variances between states, the MMR was 172/100,000 LB. In facilities, there were 937 maternal deaths (84.4%) and 173 deaths in the community (15.6 percent ). Direct obstetric mortality accounted for 678 (61.1%) of all deaths, with haemorrhage accounting for 311 (28.0%), hypertensive disorders accounting for 116 (10.5%), and sepsis accounting for 110. (9.9 percent ). Hepatitis and anaemia accounted for 432 (38.9%) of the indirect causes. The majority of hospital deaths (75.5%) occurred when patients were admitted late from home, with 55 deaths. In comparison to 2010-2012, MDs from hypertensive diseases and sepsis have reduced dramatically, but MDs from haemorrhage have remained continuously high. Home delivery, late presentation, a lack of blood, and a poor referral system are the leading causes of maternal fatalities. MDs from hypertension and sepsis have dramatically dropped, whereas MDs from haemorrhage have remained stubbornly high.

 

Author (S) Details

Umbeli Taha
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Omdurman Islamic University (OIU), Omdurman, Khartoum, Sudan.

Salah Ismail
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Omdurman Islamic University (OIU), Omdurman, Khartoum, Sudan.

Elmahgoub AbdAlla
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Omdurman Islamic University (OIU), Omdurman, Khartoum, Sudan.

Kunna Abd Alilah
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Bahri, Khartoum North, Khartoum, Sudan.

Sawsan Eltahir
Reproductive Health Program, Federal Ministry of Health, Khartoum, Sudan.

Salman Mirghani
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Omdurman Maternity Hospital, Omdurman, Sudan.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/HMMS-V18/article/view/3255

 

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