Two Transcutaneous Stimulation Techniques in Shoulder Pain: Transcutaneous Pulsed Radiofrequency (TPRF) vs. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS): Detailed Study

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Two Transcutaneous Stimulation Techniques in Shoulder Pain: Transcutaneous Pulsed Radiofrequency (TPRF) vs. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS): Detailed Study

May 5, 2020 Health and Medical Science 0

Objective: To compare the safety and efficacy of 2 transcutaneous stimulation techniques, transcutaneous pulsed radiofrequency (TPRF) versus transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), in chronic shoulder tendonitis. Design: A prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Setting: Academic pain service of a city hospital. Subjects: Fifty patients with sonography-confirmed shoulder tendonitis. Methods: Fifty patients were randomly allocated into two groups for electrical stimulation treatment with 3-month follow-ups: Group 1 (n=25), TENS; Group 2 (n=25), TPRF. Both groups underwent either treatment for 15 minutes every other day, three times total. Our primary goals were to find any treatment comfort level, adverse event, and changes in Constant-Murley Shoulder (CMS) scores. The secondary goals were finding the changes in pain, enjoyment of life, and general activity (PEG) scores. Results: For primary goals, no adverse events were noted throughout this study. No differences were found between groups for treatment tolerability (3.20±0.87 vs. 2.16±0.75). Statistically significant lower PEG scores was noticeable with the TPRF group after the course (12.73±5.79 vs. 24.53±10.21, p=0.013). Their statistical significance lasted for 3 months although the difference gap diminished after 1 month. CMS scores were significantly higher in the TPRF group (70.84±6.74 vs. 59.56±9.49, p=0.007) right after treatment course but the significance did not last.  Conclusions: In treating chronic shoulder tendinitis using two transcutaneous stimulation techniques, both TPRF and TENS are safe and effective. TPRF is superior to TENS.

Author (s) Details

Mu-Lien Lin
Department of Anesthesiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C and Department of Anesthesiology, Taipei City Hospital, Zhongxing Branch, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Hung-Wei Chiu
Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Zao-Ming Shih Feng Chia
University, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C and Department of Emergency and Critical, Care Medicine, Kuang Tien General Hospital, No.117, Shatian Road Shalu District, Taichung City 433, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Po-Ying Lee
Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Weiwu Pang
Kuang Tien General Hospital, No.117, Shatian Road Shalu District, Taichung City 433, Taiwan, R.O.C.

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