When to Brush Teeth after Single Short Time Intake of Carbonated Soft Drink to Prevent Enamel Abrasion?

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When to Brush Teeth after Single Short Time Intake of Carbonated Soft Drink to Prevent Enamel Abrasion?

February 8, 2021 Medicine and Medical Science 0

The purpose of this chapter was to assess the quantity of calcium elution from bovine enamel due to single and short immersion in carbonated soft drink, to measure the depth of the eroded lesion, and to decide when, from the point of view of preventing enamel abrasion, to brush teeth after carbonated soft drink intake. Each bovine crown was cut out of four enamel specimens (4 mm width * 4 mm height * 5 mm thickness) (a total of 8 bovine crowns were used), followed by the creation of enamel samples by embedding them in rapid cure resin. The enamel samples in each crown were randomly divided into groups of 3 minutes of immersion (IM3), 6 minutes of immersion (IM6), 9 minutes of immersion (IM9) and 12 minutes of immersion (IM12) and then submerged for the corresponding immersion time in 5 mL of carbonated soft drink. Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, the amount of eluted calcium per unit area of the enamel surface was determined, and then the depth of the demineralized lesion was estimated. In the IM6, IM9, and IM12 groups, both the volume of eluted calcium and the lesion depth were substantially greater than in the IM3 group. The lesion depth ranged from 0.05-0.35 μm, also in the IM12 community. A white spot lesion that is remineralized by oral fluid was stated to range from 50 to 600 μm, so in this study the eroded lesion depth was considered to be rapidly remineralized by saliva, so it was concluded that brushing hardly induces enamel abrasion only after a single short time intake of carbonated soft drink.

Author (s) Details

Koji Watanabe
Division of Developmental Stomatognathic Function Science, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuu, Kokurakita Ward, Kitakyushu City, 803-8580, Japan.

Shigeru Watanabe
Department of Oral Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Meikai University, 1 Meikai, Urayasu City, 279-8550, Japan.

Kenshi Maki
Division of Developmental Stomatognathic Function Science, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuu, Kokurakita Ward, Kitakyushu City, 803-8580, Japan.

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